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SCHOOL READINESS

More than 90% of brain development occurs in the first five years of life. Camp Fire School Readiness helps make the most of those years by providing on-site mentoring, professional development and educational materials to early education programs in targeted areas that will feed into Fort Worth ISD. The program improves child care teachers' understanding of child growth and development. This enables them to provide an environment and teaching that encourages children's skill development, builds literacy skills and increases interactions between the programs with local schools to support children's preparation for kindergarten.

School Readiness is defined by five areas of child development:
1  social/emotional
2 language
3
cognitive
4 physical and technological
5 motivation to learn

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research has shown that children enrolled in quality early childhood programs are better prepared with the skills and assets they need to succeed in school and in life. Since 2005, the School Readiness program has helped more than 3,800 children enter school better prepared to succeed.

An evaluation of the 2014/15 school year reveals the Camp Fire School Readiness Program's impact. For three years, students who attend a Camp Fire supported program have higher reading and math scores. Kindergarten students from Camp Fire supported programs had higher early literacy scores.

Read the most current (2014/15) School Readiness Executive Summary.

Read the 2013/14 School Readiness Report Card.

Want to learn more? Contact us online or call 817.831.2111.


"The report card gives us confidence that the program is working to prepare children for Kindergarten and then perform at academic grade level in grades 1 and beyond. In addition, it makes economic sense to help minimize the number of students repeating a grade. For example, 1,161 kindergarten through third grade children repeated a grade in one year. At roughly $7,400 per child, this costs taxpayers roughly $8.5 million which could be put to better use."
    - Joseph A. Monteleone, executive director of The Morris Foundation